About your Search

20121101
20121130
SHOW
STATION
WHUT (Howard University Television) 12
KQED (PBS) 8
WETA 7
KRCB (PBS) 3
WMPT (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 31
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
in colorado. but the president is doing well in iowa an nevada with the early vote which tells us a little bit how this thing is starting to break. >> we close this evening with this question what is the impact of the digital revolution on books, writers and publishing. joining me ken auletta, tim o reilly, jonathan safran foer an jane frieman. >> i like the idea of ebooks how they can democratize books. ma what i am afraid of is on platforms that have distracks an are inherently fast makes it harder to make books books. >> it is so important to have historical perspective. you know what we consider the book today is a relatively recent historical phenomenon. i totally disagree that homer would recognize the book. you know actually we probably more recognize the ebook. >> rose: hurricane sandy, politics and publishing when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> this has been a difficult week for the city of new york four days after hurricane sandy made landfa
for us, it's about what can be done by us to the hard and frustrating but necessary work of self-government. that's the principle we were founded on. >> rose: many saw this election as a choice between starkly different visions of america, particularly the role of government and how to fix the economy. throughout the campaign, president obama emphasized the need for balancing individualism with collective values. in doing so, he echoed the language of the new deal as franklin delano roosevelt once said "in our personal ambitions we're individualalists but in seeking political progress as a nation we all go up or else all go down as one people." its remains to be seen whetr the country can heal the wounds in the shadow of the fiscal cliff. we watch as president obama seeks to make good on his promises in a second term. joining me from chicago is bill daley. he served as white house chief of staff from january 2011 to january 2012. in february he was appointed as a co-chair of the president's reelection campaign. so my question first is about the politics of this election. how do y
us of the controversy that ensued after the president came out, after the vice president came out and really put him in a position where he either had to declare himself in favor-- because before that, he had said, "well, i really don't-- i'm not there yet. i'm not there yet" on the question-- >> ifill: evolving. >> woodruff: i'm evolving. but then after vice president joe biden said that he was absolutely in favor of gay marriage, the president a few days later came out and said he, too. >> he did him a favor. >> the fact is, the president paid no political price, and, indeed, on the contrary, may very well have been materially aided by his position. >> ifill: michael, i'm curious, is there any-- how much change happens by who we elect as our leaders and how much of it happens through these ballot initiatives, through these referenda, where the voice of the people actually speaks directly to changing laws and changing minds. >> it's its interaction of both of those things with voters. 1978 it was proposition 13 in california, which had to do with reducing state services, and an e
, hari sreenivasan. >> thanks for joining us. tonight we are going to do something different. combining the resources of pbs's news and public affairs programs, we are going to look beyond election day and examine how barack obama and mitt romney plan to fix some of america's most serious problems. the stakes could not be much higher. nearly five years after the start of the great recession, more than 20 million americans are unemployed or under-employed. the national debt has soared 16 trillion dollars. and our ability to fund medicare is in doubt. tens of millions of americans still don't have medical insurance. and the nation faces challenges around the world -- from the middle east to china. later in the broadcast jeffrey brown of the pbs newshour will look at some critical issues all but been ignored during the campaign. frontline will examine key moments that shaped both candidates' lives when they were young men. political journalists and authors will join gwen ifill on the "washington week" set to discuss how the presidency has transformed many of the men who have won it. and je
. >> rose: or if they're playing notre dame. >> well, i don't want us to play notre dame this year. >> rose: what makes you think he doesn't go to the office on saturday and sunday? >> i go to the office on saturday. >> rose: but what you do at the office and at home is the same thing. reading and on the phone. >> i'm reading and thinking and on the phone and talking to friends. there's very little difference in saturday and sunday from the weekdays. a little more action during the week, though. (laughs) >> rose: this reminds me of what surprised you most about him in terms of advice. you asked him what was the worst advice? >> well, we were doing a big action. he was going to be on the cover and so i -- without truly knowing the answer to the question i said all right, now, tell me what is the best advice you've ever gotten in your life from anyone? and he proceeded to talk for a long time about the worst advice that he had ever gotten. so i went back and told my managing editor this, which probably kind of -- with my head down in thinking well i hadn't come back with quite the right thing
. that's an early night for us all. althoughs pennsylvania better than i do. i don't think it's been awe thenltally in play. i think there was a series of head fakes going on but that's never been a central battground. >> rose: mark? >> well, they're winning pennsylvania because this is the first campaign where no one has to make choices about money because they have enough to spend and they had extra money and there wasn't any other place to put and the public polls make it clear it's closer. the president will win by a more narrow margin than four years ago. i think that the -- i agree with matthew the fundamentals matter most of all. ohio is a tricky place, though, because while the economy is better than it was, still not particularly good. >> rose: is ohio enough for governor romney? >> if he wins the southern states and colado it's enough. >> and i think one of the conversations maybe we'll have in the aftermath of this is one of the things he's had in ohio-- and it's the electoral problem that he has had-- is that the electoral college moved from an advantage they had to a democra
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)